Seipai - 十八手

# Explanation step by step 2e Dan
Begin the Kata in FUDO DACHI. Move into MUSUBI DACHI and MOKUSO on the command MOKUSO. On the next command Seipai, open eyes and wait until the command YOI. Then start perform a slow YOI DACHI with IBUKI that ends in HEIKO DACHI
1. On the command HAJIME/ICHI move forward with the right feet, turning the body 90° counterclockwise, covering with left SHOTEI and positioning the right arm for the strike, into right MAE KIBA DACHI. Execute a slow right CHUDAN HAISHU UKE (bring the left closed hand back into HIKITE).
2. Turn 90° clockwise and move forward in left ZENKUTSU DACHI and punch left SEIKEN CHUDAN OI TSUKI, with the open right hand placed on the left forearm.
3. Move forward with the right foot, turning the body 90° counterclockwise, into right MAE KIBA DACHI and strike right HIJI JODAN ATE with the left hand placed over the right fist.
4. With the hands in the same position bring the right foot back into right TSURU ASHI DACHI and kick right JODAN YOKO GERI. Return into TSURU ASHI DACHI, turn the body 180° clockwise, look to the left and place the right foot down into left MAE KIBA DACHI, and simultaneously block with a slow right HAITO UCHI UKE and left SHUTO GEDAN BARAI (with bend wrists).
5. In the same position bring the left foot back into left TSURU ASHI DACHI and kick left JODAN YOKO GERI. Place the left foot down into MAE KIBA DACHI, look to the right and simultaneously block with a slow left HAITO UCHI UKE and right SHUTO GEDAN BARAI (with bend wrists).
6. Move the left foot across to the left, covering with the right elbow and prepare to strike. Complete the turn, 90° counterclockwise, into left ZENKUTSU DACHI and strike right SHUTO GANMEN UCHI, returning the left fist closed back into HIKITE.
7. With the hands in the same position kick left TOBI MAE GERI, land into MAE KIBA DACHI, having turned the body 90° clockwise, and strike with left HIJI JODAN ATE with the right open hand placed over the left fist and KIAI.
8. Move the right foot across, turning 90° clockwise, into right ZENKUTSU DACHI and block right MOROTE SEIKEN UCHI UKE (open left hand is supporting the right arm).
9. Turn the body 90° counterclockwise, move the right foot into right SANCHIN DACHI, cover with the right fist while returning the left into HIKITE, look to the left and strike left SEIKEN CHUDAN JUN TSUKI.
10. Move the right foot forward into left NEKO ASHI DACHI, turning 90° anti-clockwise, and strike a right URAKEN OROSHI GANMEN UCHI (the right elbow should be positioned above the left open hand).
11. Still retaining the same position, with the left hand also in the same position, execute a slow right KAKE JODAN UKE (open the right hand and grab or hook the opponent’s arm).
12. Pull right hand back into HIKITE, slide forward into a right ZENKUTSU DACHI and strike right SEIKEN CHUDAN OI TSUKI.
13. Slide the right foot back, turning the body 90° clockwise, into MAE KIBA DACHI, bring the right hand open back over your head and strike right (OROSHI MAWASHI) SHUTO HIZO UCHI (left hand hold into HIKITE).
14. Bring the right foot up into right TSURU ASHI DACHI and position both arms in front of the body with both open hands in front of the face.
15. From this position kick right JODAN YOKO GERI, return to TSURU ASHI DACHI and kick right JODAN MAE GERI, step into KIBA DACHI and strike SEIKEN MOROTE GEDAN TSUKI, all in one movement.
16. Turn left, 180° counterclockwise, into left TSURU ASHI DACHI and position both arms in front of the body with both open hands in front of the face.
17. From this position kick left JODAN YOKO GERI, return to TSURU ASHI DACHI and kick left JODAN MAE GERI, step into MAE KIBA DACHI and strike SEIKEN MOROTE GEDAN TSUKI, all in one movement.
18. Move the left foot across, turning 90° counterclockwise, into left ZENKUTSU DACHI and block left SEIKEN GEDAN BARAI.
19. Bring the fists back in left WAKI no KAMAE, simultaneously make a right ASHI BARAI, turn the body 90° clockwise, look and lunge to the right into a right KAKE ASHI DACHI and strike left SEIKEN YAMA TSUKI (right fist URA GEDAN, left fist high JODAN) with KIAI.
20. Move the left foot forward, turning to the left 90° counterclockwise, into left KOKUTSU DACHI and block left SHUTO MAWASHI UKE.
21. In the same position block left SEIKEN GEDAN BARAI.
22. In the same position slowly block left SEIKEN UCHI UKE.
23. Still in the same position block right SEIKEN UCHI UKE / GEDAN BARAI.
24. In the same position repeat the block with left SEIKEN UCHI UKE / GEDAN BARAI.
25. With the hands in this position kick right JODAN MAE GERI, place the foot down in right ZENKUTSU DACHI and block right SEIKEN UCHI UKE.
26. In one movement pivot on the right foot, 180° counterclockwise, into left NEKO ASHI DACHI, simultaneously position the right arm with open hand in HAITO and left hand open in the ready strike position. At the completion of the movement the left hand slowly strikes URA YONHON NUKITE.
27. Still in the same position block SHUTO MAWASHI UKE, without the SHOTEI strike.
28. Move back with the right foot into right KOKUTSU DACHI, simultaneously thrusting both hands upwards. Swing both hands out and down quickly in a circular motion, closing the right fist and striking right (OROSHI MAWASHI) TETTSUI UCHI into the open left hand.
29. Move the left foot back into KOKUTSU DACHI, pulling both closed fists back in HIKITE and strike right SEIKEN GEDAN OI TSUKI to the center with KIAI, supporting it with the left SHUTO hand towards the inside of the right elbow arm.
30. Move the right foot back into MUSUBI DACHI and the MOKUSO position is retained.
The Kata is completed on the command NAORE the FUDO DACHI position is taken.

At the command YASUME relax and at ease.

Video

Seipai - 十八手 - source Youtube


Information Kata

Seipai translates to ‘18’ in Japanese. The kanji 十八手 used today means ‘18 hands’. This reference to ‘18’ in naming this Kata has a couple of interpretations. The pronunciation is a reproduction of the Fujian (province South-East China) dialect, Sei means ‘10’ and pai8’. It is assumed that this name was used because the Kata had originally 18 kinds of movements or techniques. The character te’ for hand is added in Okinawa.


Seipai is considered to be a Naha-Te Kata, with both hard and soft movements, including grabs arm locks and throws, circular motions for response to close, multiple attacks. It was probalbly created by Okinawans before Karate styles became systematized. In Naha, one of the three Okinawan Karate meccas, the sensei Kanryo Higaonna taught 14-year old Chojun Miyagi, who went on to found the Goju-ryu (hard-soft) system, incorporated it into Seipai and the other Kata used by the Okinawans to teach Karate to younger generations. Like the other Naha-Te Kata, Sanseru, a connection to Buddhist philosophy and sutras (books of knowledge) is suggested. Another insinuates ‘18 guards for the King’. The most apparent and most meaningful in the naming of Seipai is again from the Martial Arts development and the use of attacking pressure points. 18 is one half of 36 suggesting that perhaps an alternative set of attacks and defenses of preferred techniques and strategies from the original Sanseru 36.


The true meaning of a Kata becomes clear, when one learns the application of its Bunkai. In Seipai the applications are not immediately clear. Techniques were deliberately masked within the Kata so that bystanders were not able to fully comprehend the depth of the applications being practiced. Seipai Kata incorporates both the four directional attacks and implements techniques for both long distance and close quarter combat. Circular, whipping movements and body evasion, Tai Sabaki, dropping your body to rise up and push your opponent off balance and faints are all found within this Kata.


Known as the Southern Kata within Kyokushin Karate, the Seipai was developed from Mas Oyama's training under sensei Nei-Chu So. Sensei So was the top student of Gogen Yamaguchi (Goju-ryu) in Japan. Chojun Miyagi developed Goju-ryu from the system of Okinawan Karate, which originated from Southern Chinese Kempo. The Southern Kata generally involve shorter movements and a closer fighting distance between opponents, Maai 間合い, based on the slippery, wet terrain of Southern China.


Documentation

Instructions Seipai - 十八手


Kihon Waza

Dachi Waza

Fudo Dachi
Mosubi Dachi
Joi Dachi
Heiko Dachi
Kiba Dachi
Zenkutsu Dachi
Sanchin Dachi
Neko Ashi Dachi
Tsuri Ashi Dachi
Kake Dachi
Kokutsu Dachi


Te Waza

Seiken Chudan Oi Tsuki
Hiji Jodan Ate
Shuto Ganmen Uchi
Seiken Chudan Jun Tsuki
Uraken Oroshi Ganmen Uchi
Shuto Hizo Uchi
Chudan Morote Tsuki
Seiken Yama Tsuki
Seiken Gedan Oi Tsuki


Uke Waza

Chudan Haishu Uke
Shuto Uchi Uke
Morote Seiken Uchi Uke
Kake Jodan Uke
Seiken Gedan Barai
Shuto Mawashi Uke
Seiken Uchi Uke
Seiken Uchi Uke / Gedan Barai


Geri Waza

Tobi Mae Geri
Jodan Yoko Geri
Jodan Mae Geri


Kihon Jutsugo

Kamae - 構え, means posture or base. Kamae is to be differentiated from the word Dachi - 立ち. Dachi refers to the position of the body from the waist down, Kamae refers to the posture of the entire body, as well as encompassing one's mental readiness.Kamae
Mokusō - 黙想, means meditation, part of the training of mushin; the call to meditate.Mokuso
Hajime - 始め, means begin.Hajime
Spirit unification; the union of breath and energry in a cry.Kiai
Taken from Kendo. With the body turned half away both fists are hidden (like the sword), The HIKITE fist under and on top the other in Tettsui position.Waki no Kamae
Ibuki is karate’s hard breathing method. Ibuki breathing is a study of tension, which is necessary to truly understand relaxation. While ibuki breathing serves as a dynamic tension exercise, its true value is ki development, since it teaches the breathing control necessary for kiai. Ibuki breathing is performed in two ways, one long, and one short. Ibuki
Hikite - 引き手 means drawing hand: Hiku - 引き, to draw or pull, and Te - 手, the hand.Hikite
Foot sweep. Ashi Barai
Naore - 直れ, is a command to go back into the beginning Kamae.Naore
Yasumi - 休み, is a command to rest or relax.Yasume